FAQs

Why doesn't Wood County Solid Waste Management District host large hazardous waste collection days or scrap tire amnesty days?

The Wood County Solid Waste Management District promotes every day solutions for disposal needs. We maintain and print a listing of Wood County businesses who accept various items for disposal on a daily basis. The list of businesses and accepted items covers all materials that would typically be accepted at a collection event.

Some businesses charge a small fee, but many accept items at no cost. This allows residents an immediate solution while cleaning a basement or garage and discourages the storage of unsafe materials.

Please select our viewable/printable copy of the Household Recycling Guide or contact our office at 419-354-9297 for a paper copy.

Why doesn't my community's recycling program accept all types of plastic containers for recycling?

A common misconception is that if a package says “recyclable” or contains the “chasing arrows” recycling logo that it is recyclable everywhere.  The number stamped on the bottom of the packaging designates what type of plastic was used to manufacture it.  For example, most plastic beverage bottles are stamped with the number one, representing PET (polyethylene terephthalate).  Because plastic bottles, plastic containers, and other plastic materials are different types of plastic, they do not all melt at the same temperature which means that they can not be recycled together or used for the same type of recycled product.

Most companies seeking plastic supplies only want plastic bottles.  While there are markets for plastic containers and other plastic packaging and materials, they are few and it can be difficult to find businesses in need of this type of material.

The type of plastic accepted can vary from one community to another so it is very important to check and find out what types of plastic are accepted by your recycling program.

How do I dispose of unused paint?

First, try to buy only what you will need for the project you are working on. If you find that you have purchased too much, try donating it to a local school, club, or organization that might be able to use it.

Habitat for Humanity’s Restore will recycle latex paint for a fee of $2 per gallon.  Do not mix paint colors.

Environmental Recycling, located at 527 E. Woodland Circle, Bowling Green, will accept latex and non-latex, old and new paint for proper disposal. This business charges a fee for disposal, so you may want to call first for rates. The contact number is 800-284-9107.

OR…Latex paint can be dried with kitty litter and disposed of with your garbage. Please make sure it is dry before disposing!  Liquid paint can leak out of trash containers and find its way into storm drains, polluting local waterways.

How do I know if my paint is latex?

Look for key words on the label: If it is latex, it will have the words “latex,”
“water based,” or “acrylic” on the can.

Non-latex will say “oil based” or “alkyd.”

Check the label for clean up instructions: Latex paint can be cleaned with
soap and water. Oil based paint requires paint thinner, turpentine, mineral spirits,
or solvent.

What about empty paint cans?

Empty, metal paint cans can be recycled with steel or scrap metal.

How is the Bowling Green Recycling Center currently handling glass?

The Bowling Green Recycling Center accepts glass at the 24-Hour Drop Off.

With funding assistance from the Ohio Department of Natural Resource Division of Recycling and Litter Prevention’s Community Development Grant, the BGRC purchased two containers to load and ship the unprocessed glass to Rumpke’s glass processing facility in Dayton.  The Wood County Solid Waste Management District subsidizes the cost of shipping.  

Rumpke’s facility is equipped with optical sorting systems which sort the mixed glass cullet by color and quality.  The clear (flint) glass cullet can be used to manufacture new containers and the mixed glass cullet can be used to manufacture fiberglass insulation.   

Many across Ohio have been working toward making glass recycling more accessible and we are hopeful that projects like this one will continue to be a success!

If the Bowling Green Recycling Center is still accepting glass, then why can't Bowling Green residents put it in their curbside collection containers?

When the City of Bowling Green converted to a mixed recyclables collection system, the Bowling Green Recycling Center constructed a new sort line facility to accommodate the mixed materials. The center made the decision to restrict glass from the curbside program because of a concern for safety. A crew works on the sort line and removes a great deal of the recyclables by hand. The center did not want the employees to be exposed to the broken glass pieces coming in. Also, broken glass pieces are difficult to remove and can end up contaminating other materials, such as plastic, making them unrecyclable.

Bowling Green residents are encouraged to use their old red curbside bins to haul their glass to the Drop Off located on 1040 N. College Drive, Bowling Green.

How should I dispose of prescriptions, pills, and other medication?

As more and more people are prescribed medication, the concern is growing as the need for safe disposal increases. Experts have expressed concerns about trace amounts of medications entering local waterways potentially harming fish and other wildlife; escaping water treatment plants untreated; and ending up in the hands of drug abusers. People are now discouraged from flushing any drugs down the toilet. Instead, residents should seek proper disposal facilities or collection events.

Several agencies in Wood County offer safe disposal locations for residents.  Anyone may drop off unwanted, unused prescription drugs at these locations.

Please note: The following cannot be accepted at these locations: liquids, plastics, glass, bio-hazards, radioactive waste, syringes, drug paraphernalia or other medical waste.

Bowling Green Police Division
175 West Wooster Street, Bowling Green, OH 43402

Perrysburg Police Division
330 Walnut Street, Perrysburg, OH 43551

Perrysburg Township Police Department
26611 Lime City Road, Perrysburg, OH 43551

Wood County Sheriff’s Office
1960 East Gypsy Lane Road, Bowling Green, OH 43402

Residents may also take medication to Environmental Recycling, located at 527 E. Woodland Circle, Bowling Green, to be properly disposed of. This business charges a fee for disposal, so you may want to call first for rates. The contact number is 800-284-9107.

How should household chemicals and containers be handled and disposed of?

Be sure to read the label carefully before applying! Only apply the necessary amount needed for the area being treated or cleaned and follow all precautions. When used in excess or improperly, chemicals used in landscaping/gardening or cleaning can cause harm to pets and small children, reduce the amount of beneficial insects or plants in your yard, and wash into local storm drains causing pollution to local waterways.

Consider an organic approach and limit the amount of chemicals you use in the first place. Several commercial businesses are offering organic options of their product. Look for these items at local greenhouses, box stores, or online. Be sure to read the label to see what the product includes. Often times, the terms “organic” and “natural” can be a little misleading.

Download a copy of our “Living with Hazardous Waste” brochure for alternatives and home recipes.

Only purchase what you need! It can be costly to properly dispose of chemicals of this nature. If you cannot use all of a product, consider sharing with a neighbor or friend. Try not to store leftovers for too long.

Please visit our Household Recycling Page for a list of businesses who will properly dispose of this type of material.

Proper Disposal of Leftover Pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, household cleaners, etc.

Do NOT pour leftover chemicals into storm sewers!!! Storm sewers lead directly to rivers and streams not to the water treatment plant!

Environmental Recycling, located at 527 E. Woodland Circle, Bowling Green, will accept this material for proper disposal. This business charges a fee for disposal, so you may want to call first for rates. The contact number is 800-284-9107.

Proper disposal of empty containers that once contained pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, household cleaners

Wrap the empty container in a plastic bag and place with household garbage for collection. This applies to household materials only! Containers and chemicals from business and farming operations must be handled as commercial waste and disposed of properly at an approved facility.

Can batteries go in the trash and are they hazardous?

Consumers purchase and use billions of different types of batteries throughout the year. Some batteries are easier to recycle than others and some pose a greater risk to the environment than others. Below are some guidelines for common types of batteries.

Rechargeable Batteries – Rechargeable batteries should be recycled or disposed of properly to prevent toxic heavy metals from leaching into the environment. Several programs are in place to recycle rechargeable batteries. For a list of Wood County businesses accepting rechargeable batteries for recycling download a copy of our Household Recycling Guide or contact our office for a paper copy.

Lead-acid Batteries – Lead-acid batteries should be recycled or disposed of properly to prevent toxic heavy metals from leaching into the environment. Almost any retailer that sells lead-acid batteries collects used lead-acid batteries for recycling. For a list of Wood County businesses accepting lead-acid batteries for recycling download a copy of our Household Recycling Guide or contact our office for a paper copy.

Alkaline Batteries – 

Dispose with Trash? 
Alkaline Batteries are costly to recycle so many companies will not accept them for disposal. Since 1993 most battery manufacturers have eliminated all of the added mercury from alkaline batteries reducing the health and environmental risk they once posed. Some experts suggest that it is safe to dispose of them with your regular garbage.

Recycle? 
Environmental Recycling, located at 527 E. Woodland Circle, Bowling Green, will accept alkaline batteries for proper disposal. This business charges a fee for disposal, so you may want to call first for rates. The contact number is 800-284-9107. Also, mail-in programs are available for those wishing to collect batteries at home or at their business.

For rates and more information please visit the following websites: